From: B A R R Y on
Built_Well wrote:
> The 2 tires you have off the ground are on
> the same side of the vehicle--another no-no, according
> to the instructions on the jack stand box I read at
> Walmart/Sears.

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz...

I single point jack my '05 4x4 Tacoma at the Access / Front door gap
every time I rotate tires.

Lug nuts are loosened and torqued on the ground, the parking brake is
set, and the opposite wheels are securely chocked with a total of 4 chocks.
From: Scott Dorsey on
Built_Well <Built_Well_Toyota(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>
>The car ramps available at Walmart are unique. The ramps
>are constructed in a way that allows one to fit inside
>another.

I have a set of ramps like that that I've had for about twenty years
now. They came from a locally-owned auto parts store that is long gone.

>Each single ramp can support 3,000 pounds, so a pair would be good for
>6,000.
>But if you stack 2 together (one on top of the other), a set
>of 4 ramps can be used to lift the front end tires of
>a 12,000-pound vehicle! That's what the stickers on the ramps say,
>anyway.

I would not believe what the stickers say. Safety margins are your friend.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
From: Elle on
"Scott Dorsey" <kludge(a)panix.com> wrote
> Built_Well <Built_Well_Toyota(a)hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>The car ramps available at Walmart are unique. The ramps
>>are constructed in a way that allows one to fit inside
>>another.
>
> I have a set of ramps like that that I've had for about
> twenty years
> now. They came from a locally-owned auto parts store that
> is long gone.
>
>>Each single ramp can support 3,000 pounds, so a pair would
>>be good for
>>6,000.
>>But if you stack 2 together (one on top of the other), a
>>set
>>of 4 ramps can be used to lift the front end tires of
>>a 12,000-pound vehicle! That's what the stickers on the
>>ramps say,
>>anyway.
>
> I would not believe what the stickers say. Safety margins
> are your friend.

I would re-read the stickers. What's claimed above fails the
engineering common sense check. Namely, load supporting
structures in series ("one on top of the other") can only
carry as much weight as the weakest link. A pair stacked one
on top of the other should be safe for 3000 lbs. Three
stacked one on top of the other is safe for 3000 lbs. Etc.


From: clifto on
Noozer wrote:
> You have the rear wheel up in the air, it's on a jackstand.
>
> Now you put the front end on the jack and jack it up.
>
> At this point do you do...
>
> (a) Crawl under the car to place the jackstand, then swap the tires, then
> crawl under the car and remove the jackstand.
> - or -
> (b) Swap the tires.
>
> ...then lower the car.
>
> Seems a lot safer to do (b)

I like (c):

(c) reach under the car to place the jackstand so that if the jack falls
even an inch the jackstand will stop the car from dropping further, then
swap the tires, then reach under the car and grab the unencumbered
jackstand

--
One meter, to within 0.0125% accuracy (off by just under .005 inches):
Three feet
Three inches
Three eights of an inch
From: Mike Romain on
clifto wrote:
> Noozer wrote:
>> You have the rear wheel up in the air, it's on a jackstand.
>>
>> Now you put the front end on the jack and jack it up.
>>
>> At this point do you do...
>>
>> (a) Crawl under the car to place the jackstand, then swap the tires, then
>> crawl under the car and remove the jackstand.
>> - or -
>> (b) Swap the tires.
>>
>> ...then lower the car.
>>
>> Seems a lot safer to do (b)
>
> I like (c):
>
> (c) reach under the car to place the jackstand so that if the jack falls
> even an inch the jackstand will stop the car from dropping further, then
> swap the tires, then reach under the car and grab the unencumbered
> jackstand
>

I prefer (d): Lay the tire under the car so it can't come down any more
than that if the jack slips. Either the rear or the front tire is under
while the other is being bolted on or off.

Mike
86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00
88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's - Gone to the rust pile...