From: sharx35 on

"news" <rollingviolation(a)domain.invalid.com> wrote in message news:vxgPi.10148$1y4.2341(a)pd7urf2no...
> Tegger wrote:
>>
>> 2) The need to jack the car up.
>> Some Toyotas do not need to be jacked up to change the oil. Check where your filter is /before/ you do
>> that. Also, consult your Owner's Manual. Any important instructions specific to your car will be in
>> there, not in Auto Upkeep.
>
> My Subaru and my Chevy truck don't need to be jacked up.
> Good point - my mother's old Hyundai had an almost impossible to change filter where it was located.
>
>> 4) Using a shop rag to "protect" yourself from hot oil as you remove the drain bolt.
>> That's dumb advice. It guarantees the oil will go all over the place as it strikes the rag. The oil
>> will come out with some force.
>> It's better to wind the bolt slowly out to its very last thread, wiggling the bolt to make sure it's
>> actually disengaged from its mating threads, then quickly snatch it out of the way. Do it right and
>> your hand stays clean as a whistle.
>
> I prefer to now use a pair of disposable gloves. Less mess, less used oil goodies under my
> fingernails. The oil's not THAT hot, you're not soaking in it, you're just removing the filler plug.
>
> The funny thing is the reason why I started wearing disposable gloves when working on cars... kids.
> When my first kid started teething two years ago and wanted to chew on my knuckle... it couldn't be if
> I just came in from the garage, and even then... blech...

Best to wash up after choking the chicken!

>
> Kids do the weirdest things to you...
>
> Ray
>
> Ray


From: Mark A on
"news" <rollingviolation(a)domain.invalid.com> wrote in message
news:vxgPi.10148$1y4.2341(a)pd7urf2no...
> I prefer to now use a pair of disposable gloves. Less mess, less used oil
> goodies under my fingernails. The oil's not THAT hot, you're not soaking
> in it, you're just removing the filler plug.
>
> The funny thing is the reason why I started wearing disposable gloves when
> working on cars... kids. When my first kid started teething two years ago
> and wanted to chew on my knuckle... it couldn't be if I just came in from
> the garage, and even then... blech...
>
> Kids do the weirdest things to you...
>
> Ray

From the NIH (National Institute of Health):

"Warning: continuous contact with used motor oil has caused skin cancer in
laboratory animal tests. Avoid prolonged contact. Wash skin with soap and
water. Launder or discard soiled clothing."


From: Ray O on

"Built_Well" <built_well_toyota(a)hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:470d6c85$0$68465$892e0abb(a)auth.newsreader.octanews.com...
>
> I'm going to follow BadGolferMan's lead, and start
> changing my own oil.
>
> There's a great CD-ROM that comes with the book
> "Auto Upkeep - Basic Car Care" by Michael E. Gray.
> On the CD is a great checklist of things to do
> when changing your car's oil.
>
> Here it is:
> --
>
> Upon completion of this activity, you will be able to safely
> change the oil and filter on a vehicle.
>
> Special Tools Needed:
>
> Safety glasses, basic hand tools, correct size wrench for oil plug,
> oil filter wrench, jack and jack stands (or an automotive lift),
> oil drain pan, funnel, blocks for chocking tires (jack and jack stands
> method)
>
> Special Supplies Needed:
>
> Shop rags, latex gloves, correct type and amount of oil, oil filter
>
> Procedure:
>
> [Check off when completed. If you have any questions during the
> duration of this activity, stop and ask the instructor (if available)
> for assistance.]
>
>
> Put on your safety glasses.
>
> Warm the engine 5 to 10 minutes to loosen the contaminants and thin
> the oil for draining.
>
> Put on latex gloves. Prolonged contact with used oil may cause skin
> cancer.
>
> Raise the engine end of the vehicle with jack and jack stands or
> lift the whole vehicle on an automotive lift. Chock the tires on the
> opposite end of the vehicle when using the jack and jack stands method.
>
> Locate the drain plug on the oil pan and position the oil drain pan to
> catch the oil.
>
> Use the correct size wrench to loosen (turn counter-clockwise) the oil
> drain plug. Use a shop rag to protect your hand from the hot oil. Keep
> a steady inward pressure on the plug to avoid the hot oil from running
> down your arm. If oil seems too hot to touch, allow the oil to cool.
>
> Make sure the oil will hit the oil drain pan.
>
> Check the oil plug threads for wear. Replace if necessary.
>
> Check the oil plug gasket for cracks. Replace if necessary.
>
> While the oil is draining, use an oil filter wrench to loosen and remove
> the oil filter.
>
> Set the oil filter in the oil drain pan so the oil can drain out of it.
>
> Make certain the old oil filter gasket comes off with the old filter. If
> it is stuck on the engine block, remove and discard it.
>
> Wipe off the oil filter mounting base and the area around the oil drain
> plug.
>
> Put a thin film of clean oil on the new oil filter-mounting gasket. This
> oil helps to seal the gasket. A dry gasket may tear when the filter is
> installed causing leaks.
>
> Read the instructions on the filter. Install the oil filter by rotating
> it clockwise. Once the gasket contacts the engine, tighten it according
> to the instructions - usually 1/2 to 1 full turn. A filter wrench may
> be necessary. Do not over tighten.
>
> Prior to reinstalling the drain plug, wipe off its threads and the
> sealing surface with a shop rag. Make certain that the plug's threads
> and gasket are in good condition before reinstalling.
>
> Install the drain plug by hand and temporarily tighten finger tight. Do
> not cross-thread the plug. Tighten the plug with the correct size of
> wrench until it is snug. Do not over tighten. If unsure how tight to get
> the plug, consult the owner's manual for torque specifications. Over
> tightening can cause thread damage, while under tightening may result
> in oil leakage.
>
> If you are in a school laboratory setting, have the instructor inspect
> the oil plug and filter.
>
> Lower the vehicle.
>
> Locate and remove the oil filler cap. It is usually located on the
> valve cover. Using a funnel, pour the correct amount and type of oil
> into the filler opening. (Make sure the API and SAE ratings match what
> is listed in your owner's manual.)
>
> Start the engine and check for leaks. Extra attention should be given
> to the oil filter gasket and drain plug gasket. The oil pressure
> warning light may stay on for up to 5 seconds. If the light stays on
> longer than 5 seconds, shut the engine off and check for leaks. After
> about 30 seconds, shut off the engine. This amount of time is ample to
> circulate the oil throughout the engine and to fill the oil filter.
>
> Let the engine sit for a couple of minutes to ensure a proper reading.
>
> Check the oil level on the dipstick and correct if necessary. Do not
> overfill.
>
> Recycle your old oil and filter. Do not throw away in the garbage. Bring
> them to the proper recycling facilities.
>
> Fill out and place an oil change sticker in the vehicle.
>
> Return all tools and clean up any oil spills with floor dry.
>
> If you are in a school laboratory setting, have the instructor check the
> oil level before closing the hood.

Holy cow! It takes less time to change the oil than it probably took to
type all that up!

> Questions:
>
> 1. Why should the engine be warm when changing the oil?

So the oil flows more freely and drains more completely. Even
multi-viscosity oils flow more freely when hot. As Tegger pointed out, the
oil should be hot, not just warm, or be prepared to wait a long time for the
oil to stop draining.

>
> 2. What SAE rating did your owner's manual suggest to use?

If you are talking about SAE viscoity grades, 5W-30 is typical for most late
model Toyotas.
>
> 3. What API rating did your owner's manual suggest to use?

Always use the highest API rating available, currently SM for gasoline
engine passenger vehicles.

Check this API guide out for info about motor oil grades and ratings:
http://new.api.org/certifications/engineoil/categories/upload/EngineOilGuide2006.pdf

>
> 4. Why did you put a thin film of oil on the new oil filter gasket?

In the old days, this was to prevent the oil filter gasket from sticking to
the block. Toyota OEM filters come pre-lubricated so you should not add an
additinal film of oil.

>
> 5. How many quarts of oil did your engine take?
>
The answer depends on the engine application.
--

Ray O
(correct punctuation to reply)


From: Built_Well on

Ray O wrote:

>> 1. Why should the engine be warm when changing the oil?
>
> So the oil flows more freely and drains more completely. Even
> multi-viscosity oils flow more freely when hot. As Tegger pointed out, the
> oil should be hot, not just warm, or be prepared to wait a long time for the
> oil to stop draining.
>
>> 2. What SAE rating did your owner's manual suggest to use?
>
> If you are talking about SAE viscoity grades, 5W-30 is typical for most late
> model Toyotas.
>> 3. What API rating did your owner's manual suggest to use?
>
> Always use the highest API rating available, currently SM for gasoline
> engine passenger vehicles.
>
> Check this API guide out for info about motor oil grades and ratings:
> http://new.api.org/certifications/engineoil/categories/upload/EngineOilGuide2006.pdf
>
>> 4. Why did you put a thin film of oil on the new oil filter gasket?
>
> In the old days, this was to prevent the oil filter gasket from sticking to
> the block. Toyota OEM filters come pre-lubricated so you should not add an
> additinal film of oil.
>
>> 5. How many quarts of oil did your engine take?
>>
> The answer depends on the engine application.

========

Ray, those weren't my questions! I knew those answers [chuckle]. They
were the questions found on the CD-ROM from the book. I pasted
everything into my post, including the procedure to change the oil and
the 5 questions that followed.

I guess it was a workbook type of thing. Review Questions follow the
instructional text.
From: Mark A on
"Ray O" <rokigawaATtristarassociatesDOTcom> wrote in message
news:KZKdnT_Dft-
> Always use the highest API rating available, currently SM for gasoline
> engine passenger vehicles.
>
> Ray O

If you are going to use an oil that is better than recommended by the
manufacturer, then you might as well quit fooling around and use a full
synthetic from a reputable brand like Mobil 1 (and some others). If you do
that, you don't have to bother with checking API ratings etc.

Using a full synthetic is usually cheaper in the long run for about 75% of
the people (with the major exception being people who lease a car for 3
years or less and do not purchase it when the lease is over).

Of course, this will cut down on sales of new cars, and reduce employment in
the auto business..


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