From: Sharx35 on

"Michael" <mrdarrett(a)gmail.com> wrote in message
news:9f735bc7-f8b3-4db1-931a-a297a9bfb4d9(a)z4g2000prh.googlegroups.com...
> On Sep 4, 5:34 pm, Hachiroku ハチロク <Tru...(a)e86.GTS> wrote:
>> On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 13:40:49 -0400, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
>> > "Jeff Strickland" <crwlrj...(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> >news:h7rhso$qlu$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>
>> >> "JoeSpareBedroom" <newstr...(a)frontiernet.net> wrote in message
>> >>news:DSbom.170494$Qg6.128336(a)newsfe14.iad...
>>
>> >>> What about moving objects other than cars?
>>
>> >> ???
>>
>> > Can't think of any such objects?
>>
>> Moose. Deer. Maybe a bear. We are talking Vermont here.
>>
>> However, when I was 29 in Canada and took my Hachi up to 130, it was a
>> holiday weekend. But there were two other cars a bit in front of me,
>> clearing the path.
>>
>> No balls.
>
>
> You're in Vermont?
>
> How much is the maple syrup out there?
>
> Maple syrup was about $28 for 1/2 quart (eh, 1/2 liter) at Costco a
> few months back. On our trip to Toronto, I was excited to buy it for
> CAN$15 per liter. Wow. Then I come home to Sacramento and notice the
> price is now $13 per quart.
>
> Michael

Here in Edmonton Canada, it is $16.99 CDN a litre. Last year it was TEN
bucks CDN a litre.



From: Hachiroku on
On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 22:39:40 -0700, nm5k wrote:

> The corolla normally uses a 185/65-15. I'm pulling my hair out
> trying to decide what tires to get. I've still got a while to decide
> before they are totally shot, but they are already dangerous in
> heavy rain puddles. Fine as long as it's dry..
> I keep pondering the "low rolling resistance" tires, as the main
> reason I'm driving a puddle jumper like the Corolla is to get
> good mpg

Oh, boy, tires!

What I really made my spreadsheet up for, was to determine the widest tire
I could go with without upsetting the speedo too much.

With the Tercel, I ran out of engine long before I ran out of grip.
But I think I misspoke. I believe I ran across a set of 185/65-13s, a rare
animal these days. A few companies made them, these were Deltas.
Bridgestone made a 185/55-13, but those are long gone.

I do mostly highway driving and rural roads, so I drive 45-65 almost
everywhere. I put on fat tires to get better handling. With a 15" tire
like yours, there are a lot more options than in the 13"/14" range. Also,
have to take into account winter is coming; here for my job, that means
something that will do well in snow. For rain I have found Dunlop SP
sports to be the best, but the last set I had wouldn't even budge the car
in the snow. That was a few years ago. It could rain torrents and not
effect the grip on those tires.

Bridgestone make good tires for longevity, but you may give up something
on handling or snow conditions.

Believe it or not, Delta actually makes a decent tire. I stumbled on to
two sets of Deltas; the ones I put on the Tercel I acquired when I bought
a Corolla SR5 to strip for parts for the Hachiroku, and a friend gave me
another set for my Soob. They may not last as long as a higher priced
tire, maybe about 2/3 life, but they are also about 1/2 price for an
equivalent brand name.

Another good tire that can be hard to find is Akuret. I replaced the
Dunlops on the Hachi with some Akuret tires, and they wore well, handled
well and were a decent tire, again about 2/3 price of a similar 'brand
name' tire. They're made by Ohtsu in Japan and are handled by...Delta
dealers.

At any rate with a 15" tire, you can increase the width and decrease the
sidewall to get a tire that will keep the speedo accurate. The 185/65-15
is what I have on the Mazda and I like the ride and the handling. You
could probably even go with a 195/60-15 or a 195/55-15 if they are
available. THe 55 will give better cornering and not sacrifice a lot of
ride quality, and keep the speedo within 6%.

As far as rolling resistance, a higher treadwear number means the tread
lasts longer, and is probably a harder compound. You're not going to win
any Gymkhanas with them, but that's probably not an issue. Also, I pump my
tires up to the number on the sidewall. A bit stiffer ride, but lower
rolling resistance. (I can hear the shouts now: But the car maker says...)
Yeah, the car maker says. They are looking for a ride charachteristic. In
the case of the Scion they want the rears at 29 PSI, IIRC!!! The sidewall
says 55PSI!!! Too low pressure can cause overheating, esp at speed, and
premature tire failure. I have all the tires on the Scion at 48. With
215/45-16s that gives a harsher ride, but the thing handles like it's on
rails, and I get ~31 MPG overall.

At any rate, go tire hunting, and good luck. It give me headaches when I
have to look for new tires.

Unless I get something for 1/2 price, of course! (Supra: Hankook H106 "All
Weather" H rating tires (good for 130MPH) They are quiet, handle well and
love you long time.

Look further here:

http://www.tirerack.com

Great source of info.



From: Hachiroku on
On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 23:26:32 -0700, Michael wrote:

> On Sep 4, 5:34 pm, Hachiroku <Tru...(a)e86.GTS> wrote:
>> On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 13:40:49 -0400, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
>> > "Jeff Strickland" <crwlrj...(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> >news:h7rhso$qlu$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>
>> >> "JoeSpareBedroom" <newstr...(a)frontiernet.net> wrote in message
>> >>news:DSbom.170494$Qg6.128336(a)newsfe14.iad...
>>
>> >>> What about moving objects other than cars?
>>
>> >> ???
>>
>> > Can't think of any such objects?
>>
>> Moose. Deer. Maybe a bear. We are talking Vermont here.
>>
>> However, when I was 29 in Canada and took my Hachi up to 130, it was a
>> holiday weekend. But there were two other cars a bit in front of me,
>> clearing the path.
>>
>> No balls.
>
>
> You're in Vermont?
>
> How much is the maple syrup out there?
>
> Maple syrup was about $28 for 1/2 quart (eh, 1/2 liter) at Costco a
> few months back. On our trip to Toronto, I was excited to buy it for
> CAN$15 per liter. Wow. Then I come home to Sacramento and notice the
> price is now $13 per quart.
>
> Michael


I don't think you can compare California maple syrup...

It was a bad season, but $28 for a half litre is BAD.
It was about $32 a gallon.


From: JoeSpareBedroom on
"Hachiroku ????" <Trueno(a)e86.GTS> wrote in message
news:pan.2009.09.05.00.34.45.789748(a)e86.GTS...
> On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 13:40:49 -0400, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
>
>> "Jeff Strickland" <crwlrjeff(a)yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:h7rhso$qlu$1(a)news.eternal-september.org...
>>>
>>> "JoeSpareBedroom" <newstrash(a)frontiernet.net> wrote in message
>>> news:DSbom.170494$Qg6.128336(a)newsfe14.iad...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> What about moving objects other than cars?
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> ???
>>
>>
>> Can't think of any such objects?
>
> Moose. Deer. Maybe a bear. We are talking Vermont here.
>
> However, when I was 29 in Canada and took my Hachi up to 130, it was a
> holiday weekend. But there were two other cars a bit in front of me,
> clearing the path.
>
> No balls.


Swell, until the car in front of you hits a deer and becomes the stationary
barrier you wish wasn't there.


From: Jeff Strickland on

"Hachiroku ????" <Trueno(a)e86.GTS> wrote in message
news:pan.2009.09.05.02.41.59.321873(a)e86.GTS...
> On Fri, 04 Sep 2009 18:26:00 -0700, Jeff Strickland wrote:
>
>>
>> "Hachiroku ????" <Trueno(a)e86.GTS> wrote in message
>> news:pan.2009.09.03.18.55.37.548677(a)e86.GTS...
>>> On Thu, 03 Sep 2009 08:57:26 -0700, Jeff Strickland wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>> The wider tire, by itself would not change the speedo. But the aspect
>>>> ratio
>>>> (sidewall height) is a percentage of the width, so the wider tire will
>>>> give
>>>> a taller tire if the aspect RATIO remains the same. 45% of 225 is a
>>>> bigger
>>>> number than 45% of 215, so the 225 is not only wider, it's taller as
>>>> well.
>>>
>>> Back when I was sitting in the Used Car Sales office, and had not much
>>> to
>>> do between customers, I came up with a spreadsheet that would calculate
>>> the speedo error based on the size tire, and give you the actual MPH
>>> based
>>> on tire size. I did it by coming up with the circumference of the tire,
>>> and then formulating that into 5,280 feet per mile. It was pretty slick
>>> I
>>> posted it here about 5-6 years ago.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> How do you calculate the ERROR based on tire size? The best I can figure
>> out
>> is the variance in the error when the tire size changes.
>>
>> The auto maker wants the speedo to read 45 when you are doing 43, or 70
>> when
>> doing 66, so that you can't claim that it said 40 when you got a ticket
>> for
>> doing 50 in a 45. But, how can you calculate any amount of error knowing
>> only the tire size. The best you can do is determine the plus/minus
>> change
>> in the speedo when a custom tire is fitted.
>
> Interesting as it may seem, by 'measuring' the speed using those radar
> speed readouts the cops set up, the Toyotas I have had with mechanical
> speedos were more accurate. They were usually spot on, or within a small
> percentage.
>
> For instance, I found out my Tercel was more accurate with 175/70-13s than
> with the spec'd 155/80-13s.
>
> The spec'd tire had a diameter of 14.93", while my 'special' tire was
> 15.64".
>
> The tires I put on were accurate at 70MPH. Don't ask me how I know, we
> don't want Joe to start up all over again...
>
>
>


All of that is absolutely true. The larger tire will dial the speedo in to
more accurate reading. If the speedo has an error of 4 mph and you put on a
larger tire, the error will drop to 1 mph, give or take. Of course, you can
go crazy with this -- as truck owners are prone to do -- and fit a too-large
tire. When this happens, you have a case of a speedo reading 45 when you are
really doing 50 -- I have such a truck.

You can drive a measured mile at a steady speed with a stop watch and do a
little bit of math to find if the speedo is accurate. For most cars, the
speedo is fast by a few mph. A mile at 60 mph should take 60 seconds, if the
speedo is fast then the actual running time will be more like 65. You should
find that a steady speed of about 64 or 65 mph will be needed to cover a
measured mile in 60 seconds. OR you can get the GPS out and compare the
speedo with it.

As it turns out, the tires I suggested to you for the tC (225 instead of the
215s it has) should do exactly what you found to happen with the old Tercel
you had. I run a 225/45 on my BMW, and the speedo is virtually dead-nuts
accurate. I think I'm off about 1 mph at 85. My car came with the 225/55x15,
which gave me 67.9 revs per mile. I fitted a set of 225/45x17, and the revs
per mile dropped to 67.3. The difference changed the speedo error from a
range of about 4 1/2 mph at 85 to just over 1 mph at 85.

The 225/45 on your tC will be about 3/8" larger diameter than the 215/45s
that are on it now. The revs per mile will drop from 68.2 to 67.3. That's a
drop of 0.9 revolution per mile, my change in tires on the BMW made a change
of 0.6 revs per mile. You might find that the speedo on the tC will go to
reading slower than you are actually going by about 1 mph. _Maybe_ you have
a larger error to correct than I had, and the change will be perfect.

I wasn't out to correct the speedo error when I changed tires, it just
happened. I found that 4 of the 225/55x15s cost $1000 out-the-door, with
taxes and installation charges, and so on, and the only maker of that size
is Michelin. The 225/45x17s are far less expensive and there are many brands
to choose from. I also had honeycomb rims with a million tiny holes that
were a PITA to clean. I found a complete set (all 5) of 17" rims from a '95
BMW M3 that have 10 double-spokes -- 10 narrow slots and 10 very wide slots
to clean. I've only seen one other BMW in Southern California with my rims,
and my 325i Convertible is the only one with these rims, so I take pride in
having a unique car. The bonus of having a very cool looking car is that I
can buy shoes for it at the discount store.